Something Old, Something Novel, Something Stolen, Something Green

Last of our Summer 2017 Blog Series! Happy new semester! Contributed by Rachael Wade As scientists, we often accept DNA evidence as absolute truth. The information we are able to elucidate from these data-packed molecules are undeniable and reliable. However, it’s important to remember the work that came before more modern techniques like DNA sequencing... Continue Reading →

Advertisements

Naive Expectations: Fieldwork in Hawai’i

Second story in our Summer 2017 Blog Series! Enjoy! Contributed by Catherine Hudson “We’re doing fieldwork in Hawaaaaaiiii! We’re doing field work in Hawaaaaiii,” I sang out as we began to rig up the kayak for our adventure. It was a beautiful day in paradise complete with a bright sun overhead, majestic mountains rising up... Continue Reading →

Up Bear Creek

This is the first of our Summer Blog Series! Enjoy!  Contributed by Tanya Harrison “I don’t have to run faster than the bear, I just have to run faster than you.” My boss liked flinging that saying around while we worked together in bear county. I could never tell if she was joking. Bear country,... Continue Reading →

Bridging the Gap

Contributed by Leah Shizuru Whooosh... As I stood near the puka and gazed at the raw beauty of the steady flow of incoming ocean water spilling into the fishpond I listened to and appreciated the unmistakable sound of rushing water. What a thrilling experience for both the eyes and ears. It was hard to fathom... Continue Reading →

The art in microbial oceanography – why data visualizations and art are two sides of the same coin

Contributed by Markus Lindh When I visited the Museum of Modern Art in New York City this December, I was struck by the similarities between the Jackson Pollock collection and data visualizations of microbial oceanography. It may seem surprising, but the processes of science and art are very similar, if not identical. Some of the major cornerstones of... Continue Reading →

Thinking Small: Part I

It isn't easy to study life forms we can't see. It's not easy to talk about them, either. This is the first installment in a series about why and how we (try to) do it anyways. Contributed by Alice Vislova You can imagine that microbes make tricky research subjects, being invisible to the naked eye,... Continue Reading →

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑